Tag Archives: studies

Contraceptive Studies via the Stimulus for Notre Dame, What’s That All About?

In the past when I predominately wrote for The 912 Project Fan Site, I wrote the pieces Blame Notre Dame (FR. Jenkins) for the Shame of the Obama Game and Pay No Attention to That Man Behind the Curtain…. My religion has not forsaken me, and I will not forsake one of its great institutions.

I often tread the StimulusWatch site and thought… with the sudden illumination of taxpayer funds to be deviated for abortions, I would put in the search term Abortion and see what it returned. Much to my alarm the first entry was for Notre Dame:

Type Description Amount City State Jobs Vote
Grant The Impact of Early Access to Oral Contraception on the Health of Women and Child $89,729 Notre Dame IN 1 0
Grant Genetics of Moral Cognition $50,811 Boston MA 0 0
Grant Human Decidual Leukocytes and Their Placental Ligands $414,786 Cambridge MA 1 0
Grant ARRA Uterine NK Cells in Primate Pregnancy $574,102 Madison WI 1 0
Grant MEIOTIC INTERACTIONS OF THE RECA HOMOLOGUE DMC 1 $245,677 Chicago IL 1 0
Grant SIALIC ACID O-ACETYLATION IN GBS PATHOGENESIS & IMMUNITY $79,997 La Jolla CA 0 0
Grant A RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF LETROZOLE VS CLOMIPHENE IN INFERTILE WOMEN WITH PCOS $274,042 Hershey PA 0 0
Grant CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSE TO RVFV INFECTION $28,056 Galveston TX 0 0
Grant Antioxidant Status, Diet, and Early Pregnancy $271,987 Lebanon NH 0 0
Grant SUBJECTIVE EXPECTATIONS AND BIRTH CONTROL CHOICE $85,427 Santa Monica CA 0 0


Drilling down to the link one discovers:
NOTRE DAME, IN

UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME DU LAC

Grant: $89,729National Institutes of Health – May. 29, 2009

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Award Description: This project will explore how historic changes in young women?s access to oral contraception affected the health of women and their children. During the 1960s and 1970s, most states changed the age at which young unmarried women could obtain a prescription for oral contraception (?the pill?) without their parents? consent. These policy changes created significant variation in whether women could obtain the pill across states and time. Using regression analysis on data taken from a number of readily available sources, the investigators will exploit this variation in access to the pill across place and time to examine how early legal access to the pill impacted various health-related outcomes of young women and their children. Regarding young women, the investigators will examine how early legal access to the pill affected the likelihood that a young woman gave birth, obtained an abortion, or became a single mother. Regarding the children of young women, the investigators will examine how maternal access to the pill affected child mortality and birth weight, and how maternal access to the pill affected the likelihood that a child grew up in a single parent household, in an impoverished household, or in a household on welfare or public assistance. The findings of this research project will be significant for both researchers and policy makers. The investigators know of no work in any discipline that exploits birth control?s historic diffusion to examine its relationship with abortion; the connection between these two fertility control technologies remains an open question. Moreover, a large body of work in economics suggests that access to abortion had important impacts on children?s living circumstances and wellbeing, but this work raises the as-yet unanswered question of whether access to the pill?the major fertility control innovation in recent history and the most popular form of contraception in the United States?also affected childhood outcomes. The investigators will make significant contributions to all of these issues. Moreover, the project will help shed light on current policy debates regarding historic demographic trends, such as the rise in single motherhood among young women occurring in the 1970s. The data needed for this project are readily obtainable and preliminary research is currently under way.

Project Description: As defined in the Award Description field

Jobs Summary: Subaward: Faculty Tenured (Total jobs reported: 1)

Project Status: Less Than 50% Completed

This award’s data was last updated on May. 29, 2009. Help expand these official descriptions using the wiki below.

I did spend a considerable amount of time attempting to locate the designated 1 job holder/faculty member without any luck. Hopefully the Notre Dame Alumni can pursue this incomplete project and determine its worth!

I want to thank all of my contacts at Notre Dame today, you know who you are!

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